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September / October 2002 Cover


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UMaine Today Magazine 

September / October 2002 Features:

Fighting to be Somebody
Fighting to be Somebody

School-age girls are fighting among themselves, using relational aggression to gain self-esteem and power. Research by UMaine's AAUW Scholar in Residence Lyn Mikel Brown examines that dark underside of girls' friendships, looking at both its effects and causes.

 
Lessons in Classic Horror Films
Lessons in Classic Horror Films

UMaine English Professor Welch Everman is changing the way people view horror movies. He urges students to "read" the popular culture artifacts as critically as they read a text, analyzing the ways such flicks challenge the status quo of the dominant culture.   

 
Exercising Democracy
Exercising Democracy

Maintaining a healthy democracy takes more than giving your right to vote a workout. According to political scientist Amy Fried, citizens need to be active and informed to avoid being manipulated by public opinion or lulled into apathy. 

 
Survival of the Fittest - and the Least Stressed
Survival of the Fittest - and the Least Stressed

Biologist Rebecca Holberton is unlocking the mysteries of hormonal responses in birds. Such knowledge can help in monitoring the health of species and the environment, while also aiding conservation efforts.

 
Oyster Options
Oyster Options

Shellfish aquaculture is growing in the state with the help of a marine team, sponsored by University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Maine Sea Grant.

 
Fungi Wars
Fungi Wars

This summer, growing fungi (and seeing which grew the fastest) was the key to learning practical uses of math and science for 44 students in UMaine's Upward Bound program. The University has hosted the federally funded program every summer since its inception 11 years ago.

 
To Label or Not to Label?
To Label or Not to Label?

Resource economist Mario Teisl is analyzing consumer attitudes about labels being considered for products containing genetically modified ingredients. What he finds will provide a basis for developing new labeling standards.

UMaine Today
Creativity and Achievement at the University of Maine
Volume 2 Issue 4

 

UMaine Today Magazine
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