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November / December 2003


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UMaine Today Magazine 

November / December 2003 Features:

Clockwork
Clockwork

Psychologist Alan Rosenwasser's basic research looks at the relationship between biological rhythms and depression and substance abuse. Better understanding of the effects of such disorders on the circadian clock could one day lead to new and improved treatments in humans.

 
Investigating Forensics
Investigating Forensics

With the popularity of such television shows as CSI, forensics classes are popping up on many college campuses. At UMaine, Irv Kornfield, director of a wildlife forensics laboratory, offers a course in forensic science. Adding human forensics expertise is physical anthropologist and policy analyst Marcella Sorg. Together, the researchers provide real-life perspectives on the science behind the investigations. 

 
Understanding Tern Limits
Understanding Tern Limits

A seven-year study by wildlife ecologist Fred Servello is one of the first in the country to take a long-term approach to understanding black tern habitat. Research into the factors endangering the species is leading to recommendations for management strategies.

 
University Singers
University Singers

The 64-member University Singers is renowned for its esprit de corps, its role in student recruitment and its dynamic director, now in his 26th year. Professor of Music Dennis Cox, known to students and alumni as DC, is the high-energy, charismatic soul of the group. Together, they make music on campus, in New York's Carnegie Hall, and throughout New England and Europe.

 
Gone South for the Winter
Gone South for the Winter

Brenda Hall is a leading young scientist studying evidence of abrupt climate change that occurred in Antarctica thousands of years ago. Working on ice sheets at the bottom of the world, Hall and her team use tweezers and spoons to hunt for those clues bits of algae, shell or animal skin that are often "the size of cornflakes," yet monumental in their meaning.

 
Power of the Basket Tree
Power of the Basket Tree

The ancient Wabanaki basketmaking tradition is alive in Maine, perpetuated by a strong commitment to cultural preservation by the state's tribal communities. The University of Maine supports the effort with educational outreach, economic development expertise and forestry research.

UMaine Today
Creativity and Achievement at the University of Maine
Volume 3 Issue 6

 

UMaine Today Magazine
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The University of Maine
, Orono, Maine 04469
207-581-1110
A Member of the University of Maine System